Day 1

Liverpool Day 1

I am staying Liverpool for a couple of days to visit my Stepbrother who is at university here. We are going to the Liverpool Philharmonic to see Beauty and the Beast live in concert, my Christmas present to him, and to myself. Whilst here I am of course planning to do some building spotting as I have never been to Liverpool.

Being dropped off at your hotel by a lovely Liverpudlian taxi driver is the perfect way to begin a trip to Liverpool. After a long train ride from Bristol and a much needed rest most of the day is gone. We have the theatre this evening so not too much time for sight seeing but we’ll do our best.

Our first early evening stop is to the Albert Dock and the surrounding area. A good way to tick one building off of the list and get some food before the show. The Albert Dock is one of the buildings from the book ”1001 Buildings you Must See Before you Die”. I have to say personally I was  more impressed by the  Liver building and other buildings that surround the Albert Dock although I think the wind and heavy rain may have influenced my opinion slightly.

Here are some of the pics I took of the buildings that I fell in love with.

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DSC06381.JPGThe Cunard Building  – Some closer pictures of this spectacularly detailed building.DSC06350DSC06408

Beautiful detailing on the side of this buildingDSC06398

DSC06412DSC06374The all important Liver Building

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DSC06348But it was this art deco gem was my personal favourite. More stunning detail coming up

DSC06357This was a truly stunning building and I was quite shocked to discover that it was only a ventilation building. (The Mersey Tunnel Ventilation Station).

When we finally got to the Royal Albert Dock time was pressing on and the weather was worsening so I don’t think these pictures do it justice and despite what I said earlier I love this area and think it would be a great place to spend time when the weather is nice.

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Just as I thought that that was it for the evening with regard to building watch the theatre looks like this!

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Full of lots of lovely Art Deco details I was pleasantly suprised once again this evening unfortunately my camera died and the photos that I took on my phone were not good so this is the only picture I have to show you of this building.

Well that really is it now. Time for the show. Can’t wait to explore Liverpool tomorrow, I have a feeling it’s gonna be good.

Antoni Gaudi

b. 25.06.1852 d.10.06.1926

Gaudi was a Catalonian born Spanish architect and is most famous for his works in Barcelona. Gaudi’s style was very distinctive and his designs were very advanced for the time using references to nature in much of his work. religion was also a key factor for Gaudi and evidence of this can be seen in his extremely detailed designs for his cathedral, the Sagrada Familia. Gaudi’s work was very influential in the Spanish ‘Modernisme’ design movement which became the Spanish equivalent to ‘Art Nouveau’.

 

Santiago Calatrava

b. 28.07.1951

Calatrava is a Spanish born architect famous for his very sculptural style.

This is the only piece of Calatrava’s work that I have been lucky enough to see

DSC05788 DSC05787Although this is the only one of Calatrava’s works that I have actually seen, I have seen many others in books and I really hope that one day I get to see some more of his work.

Frank Gehry

b. 28.02.1929

Canadian/American architect Frank Gehry is famous for his contemporary architecture and sculptural instillations that can be seen all over the world. His works include the Guggenheim in Bilbao Spain and works that I have been lucky enough to see in New York and in Sydney. Gehry has a very distinctive sculptural element to his work. It is easy to spot a Frank Gehry building in a crowd. As one of my personal favourite contemporary architects I  have only seen three of his works so far, two of which sculptural instillations so I am looking forward to seeing some more of his work.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

b. 27.03.1886 d. 17.08.1969

Mies van der Rohe was a pioneering German architect whose work was at the forefront of the modernist design movement. Mies van der Rohe was the director of the Bauhaus school of art and design from 1930-1933. After leaving Germany he moved to America where he was able to realise his dream of building a skyscraper, something that was not possible in Germany ( in the war years under Hitler’s reign over Germany).

He became the head of an architectural school in Chicago, and continued his work in the USA.

I think every person who reads this will know something of the work of Mies van der Rohe, either by his famous Barcelona chair (commonly seen in black).

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Or by his very famous quotes:

“God is in the detail” Mies van der Rohe

Wait for it, this one you will definitely know:

“Less is more” Mies van der Rohe

 

Sagrada Familia

DSC05566The Sagrada Familia – Antoni Gaudi – 1882 – Current Day

This wonderful building has been under construction for 136 years and is not due to be completed until 2026. The project will be completed to mark the 100 year anniversary of the Gaudi’s death.

Gaudi took over the design and building of this cathedral in 1883 and spent 43 years of his life working on it. He even moved in to his study in later years and spent the last years of his life living there, devoting his life solely to its work.

DSC05365The Nativity facade.

The detail in this building and in this facade particularly is mind blowing. The facade depicts scenes from the nativity. I have since read a lot more about this building in a book I bought called “The Basilica Of The Sagrada Familia” (the Visual Edition)  by Dosde Publishing which is very detailed and explains all elements of the building in great detail.DSC05367DSC05369DSC05372Pictures from the Cathedral’s interior belowDSC05393DSC05417DSC05421The vaults that you can see in this column enabled Gaudi to build this building without the traditional method of buttresses. These vaults provide support for the building and also an interesting interior space designed to look like a forest. You can see in this picture that the vaults divide and multiply just like tree branches.DSC05429The helmets upon the above figures (the Soldiers) remind me very much of some of the chimneys designed for the Casa Mila (a private residence designed by Gaudi), I have since read in the book about the Sagrada Familia (mentioned above) That the inspiration did in fact come from those chimneys and was also done so in homage to Gaudi.DSC05428DSC05431DSC05435These hard lined sculptures on the passion facade are very different to the shapes on the other facades. I found out in the museum that the passion facade is all about the crucifixion of Jesus. The blunt, harsh lines of all of the sculpture work on this facade was designed to depict the mourning and suffering caused by these events.DSC05559Workshop of the Sagrada Familia

DSC05445DSC05458The School building, set in the grounds of the Sagrada Familia, designed by Gaudi for local children and children of the cathedral’s workers.DSC05477DSC05479